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Jim Triplett Aluminum Cargo Container House

Posted on July 1, 2014 at 11:15 AM

Please note that the 8x30 in not to be viewed as a house on wheels, I only showed them for transport and I would consider it a permanent structure.It is for category 1 or 2. The 8x20, I do want to enter in the house on wheels category (3), as it is designed to be moved at will. Utilizing well water and propane as well as solar for the 8x30, and an on-board water cistern in the utility room.




Categories: Contest Submissions

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5 Comments

Reply Jimbo Triplett
9:08 AM on July 25, 2014 
Thanks for your input.
I think either Colten steel or aluminum container would be fine, I just have a preference for the self insulated aluminum with food grade stainless steel interior as my favorite. I stand by my choice for the dual sink shared idea as it is not totally original to me. I saw one in Europe and thought It just made sense. As I would most likely live in this when traveling with my wife, I'm not too concerned with any cross contamination. My wife has been in the health industry for most of her working life, and we have always used very healthy practices. We have run homes for handicapped children and adults alike, and were teachers in Special Ed (where we met 25 years ago. we have grown accustomed to making healthy practices a way of life, sometimes out of necessity. I do think, however, you make a valid point on this issue. Moving to a single (large) sink in the kitchen, and a smaller one separate in the bath makes sense as well. It probably would not take too much extra copper to run it that way, so I am open to that as well. A simple fix and probably not too costly, but for me personally, I'll stand by my design. I really appreciate your input as you have caused me to think outside the box a little more, while keeping healthy living in the forefront of my ideas. I have other drawings utilizing several cargo containers. Some designs utilize 2, 3, or 4 containers, but these did not conform to the rules of this contest. Having said that, I am having a blast designing these "Tiny Homes" and have a well-spring of ideas. My entries reflect my personal choices for a permanent structure as well as one that can travel with you.
Many thanks for your interest, and your input. I value both.
Jimbo T
Reply Knot-Kupid
7:49 PM on July 17, 2014 
Jimbo Triplett says...
My name is James Triplett "Jimbo". I have been a graphic designer for about 20 years, mostly in commercial and industrial graphics. This is my first attempt at architecture and house interior design. I guess some of the reasons I chose to endeavor in this project is because I am a huge fan of re-purposing as much as we can in this world, for future generations. as well as for ourselves. I chose aluminum shipping containers for my project because, after some research, I found the containers to be generally more suitable for the long term living aspect. The research I followed stated that aluminum containers are a bit stronger, more water-tight than their steel cousins, and come very well insulated, with double wall construction. They are Steel framed with exterior aluminum sides, insulation, and food-grade stainless steel walls in the interior, so you get double wall strength, not to mention rust proof and a number of other sustainable factors. The double sink idea still keeps the bath and kitchen separate as the sliding "pocket" door to the bath allows for privacy. the only exposed part is between the 2 rooms, a cubby hole large enough only for the sink nozzle to be utilized on both sides, there-by lessoning the amount of plumbing needed.
I really appreciate your comments.
JimboT

Thank you for your reply, it will spawn further research on my part as I'm currently designing my own personal living space (not for public application) and have decided that the ubiquitous cargo container is a real choice, although, I'll probably purchase a new unit instead of a used one. I read so much material that leans towards the Cor Ten units for various reasons and that heavily influenced my comment. Thank you for an alternate and possibly better choice for my own needs.
I guess I just have a hangup with the bath/kitchen situation having lived in many communal situations in the past. But it sure makes sense in saving an extra run of copper and purchasing a second sink though, there still remains the concern around a possibility of unhealthy cross contamination. Again, thank you for your comments on the trailer choice height as without being able to use the included scaling I had no real idea how tall the final combination would be. Good luck in bringing your project to fruition. Here's to a better life for all of us.
Reply Jimbo Triplett
12:55 PM on July 16, 2014 
Hi again,
I just wanted to touch bases a bit more about my design choices. As far as the height, it would easily fit on a long flat bed Ford Super Duty Dually Diesel Truck, (which I have been wanting for a while now. The max height can be 13' 6" for highway travel and these are transported by Tractor-trailors now (which are higher than previously mentioned Ford Truck).
The document should be 8.5" x 11" letter size.
I agree that the south facing wall would need at least an RV type awning at the very least. I like your suggestion. I chose brown to add some solar gain potential and I just like the color
Actually, as I may have mentioned in the previous comment, The bath remains completely private when the pocket door is closed, and a small curtain could be added to the cubby space where the faucet is utilized,
Just a note, I taken offense at any comments, as I am new to this whole interior design stuff. I have never used Sketch-up, so I did this in Adobe Illustrator, hence the 2D version of things (what I know anyway). I look forward to building this in the future, although I will have to employ the expertise of an electrician and plumber to get the best possible quality that I can.
Again, Thank you for your interest and comments.
JimboT
Reply Jimbo Triplett
11:07 AM on July 16, 2014 
My name is James Triplett "Jimbo". I have been a graphic designer for about 20 years, mostly in commercial and industrial graphics. This is my first attempt at architecture and house interior design. I guess some of the reasons I chose to endeavor in this project is because I am a huge fan of re-purposing as much as we can in this world, for future generations. as well as for ourselves. I chose aluminum shipping containers for my project because, after some research, I found the containers to be generally more suitable for the long term living aspect. The research I followed stated that aluminum containers are a bit stronger, more water-tight than their steel cousins, and come very well insulated, with double wall construction. They are Steel framed with exterior aluminum sides, insulation, and food-grade stainless steel walls in the interior, so you get double wall strength, not to mention rust proof and a number of other sustainable factors. The double sink idea still keeps the bath and kitchen separate as the sliding "pocket" door to the bath allows for privacy. the only exposed part is between the 2 rooms, a cubby hole large enough only for the sink nozzle to be utilized on both sides, there-by lessoning the amount of plumbing needed.
I really appreciate your comments.
JimboT
Reply Knot-Kupid
2:31 PM on July 15, 2014 
Interesting 8x20 plan although, I believe that the aluminum containers are shied away from in most architectural applications where their Cor Ten cousins are preferred instead. I like the non-rusting aspect and pre-insulated (as you don't have to foam spray the unit yourself) situation but are they as strong, isn't the wall structure similar to foam core with aluminum on one side and thin stainless steel on the other? I know that shipping containers get their strength from the rigid post corner construction but is it just the greater cost of the aluminum units that cause them to be avoided in most cargo container structural applications or are they overall considered weaker for architectural applications? By the way, in order to actually preview your design I found I had to copy-paste it into another doc and then resize it as so much of your text is too small to be legible in this current presentation, at least for me. A little more upbeat, I liked your use of the one foot grid to see various dimensions, a good one here.

I'm assuming its not going to be the standard trailer with fender skirts but a higher flatbed used for any and all transport purposes. Would this present an additional cost over other trailers and since this is a High Cube unit what about Highway travel? I do like the use of stairs in lieu of the usual ladder in the tiny houses although for me, it would have to be a longer stair run as the occasional twitch from a pinched disc can render agile climbing (yes, its no more rock faces for me) as a thing of my youth Lol. I sort of wonder how this design would look in an interior view beyond the floor plan so I wished you had provided some interior elevations to flesh out your design vision. As a side note, for us here in Florida, all windows on the southern wall without a large overhang or porch would spell disaster. ;) Obviously, you are in a colder clime and are interested in buffering your northern exposure while increasing your solar gain from your southern facing windows. And here, I'm not sure why you chose brown as your heat gain color though, is it just an aesthetic choice or does it have another reason?

This is the second design that includes the bath being open to the living area (the other so far has a soaking tub). I'm not sure I'm a fan of having half my kitchen included in my bathroom even if you utilize the split sink for double duty (I'm assuming that's what is shown in your floor plan). I once lived in the Big Apple in a village arts loft with an open floor plan, and the large claw-footed tub basically resided out in the open area as part of the multipurpose space and it lead to some rather interesting situations. Some were fun and some not so amusing even for life in those wild and crazy guy seventies. This sort of reminds me of that experience, so does it really add much in the line of sight vs. the lack of privacy while someone preps for cooking? Or, maybe I'm just getting too old and prudish, Lol.

By the way, as a bit of explanation, I'm considering strongly the use of the ubiquitous cargo container for my own tiny house so I have a vested interest in the aluminum vs steel question so I'm not just doing a drive by here, thus please don't take offense at the Al vs Fe question. Thanks for sharing your design here and I look forward to any comments, if you feel inclined.


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